Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 32

Thread: Bought a Yamaha WR250R

  1. #21
    Diggin'dirt motorrad's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Name
    Tom
    Location
    Carmel Valley
    Bike(s)
    WR250R
    Posts
    1,746

    Re: Bought a Yamaha WR250R

    Quote Originally Posted by Yak View Post
    Also, another good accessory to have is ASV unbreakable levers. I like the F3 version.

    http://asvinventions.com/levers_order/
    Hi Kevin, Yak,

    The WRR accessories don't always match/compatible with the YZ and WRF line. I see Zeta makes nice pivot clutch and brake levers though.

    Here's what I'm adding for now.

    Skid plate
    Zeta hand/lever/flasher guards
    Radiator guard
    Edge tail light; Zeta drive, heel, and rear disk guards

    A minimalist dirt/street bike, with nice suspension. When the skid plate goes on, the can will come off. Thumpertalk has a great page on this bike.

    I can't stop smiling.
    You can't always get what you want, but if you try sometimes, you get what you need - The Rolling Stones

  2. #22
    Diggin'dirt motorrad's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Name
    Tom
    Location
    Carmel Valley
    Bike(s)
    WR250R
    Posts
    1,746

    Re: Bought a Yamaha WR250R

    Quote Originally Posted by k7lvo View Post
    Tom, good to see you back on the road! A couple of the folks in our riding group up here have gotten dirt bikes, and I can't hardly get them on the pavement anymore. They tell me that I should get one, but I'm resisting; I'm too old to die!
    Hey Lewis, riding is part of my DNA. Dirt riding is fun, it adds a whole different perspective to riding, and I have come to enjoy the dirt trails and the more remote areas you get to see. I'd say it's worth a try with friends, just go real easy at first, and I know your FJR will understand leaving her for a day on a dirt bike to test out. A flirt with the dirt can be fun.
    Last edited by motorrad; 10-12-2008 at 07:33 PM.
    You can't always get what you want, but if you try sometimes, you get what you need - The Rolling Stones

  3. #23
    Diggin'dirt motorrad's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Name
    Tom
    Location
    Carmel Valley
    Bike(s)
    WR250R
    Posts
    1,746

    Re: Bought a Yamaha WR250R

    Quote Originally Posted by YamaLink View Post
    My friend bought a 4runner hitch mounted carrier off of ebay, and it was inexpensive even with shipping. Well-built and lightweight.

    I had a Moto Carrier for my 4runner but it was unstable. I blame my bored out hitch receiver, ha.
    Hey Dan, what type hitch carrier did you get? I'm still shopping for one, narrowing it down. Just curious, are you the YamaLink as in producing the cool suspension lowering kit? Had to ask.
    You can't always get what you want, but if you try sometimes, you get what you need - The Rolling Stones

  4. #24
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Name
    Dan
    Location
    Boise
    Bike(s)
    Honda Cub Hillclimb Missile
    Posts
    18

    Re: Bought a Yamaha WR250R

    Hi,
    Yes sir, I'm the lowering link guy.

    Another option is http://www.toyota-4runner.org/showth...&threadid=5092

    As for my rack, I think the name is Moto Tote: http://www.mototote.com/

    Quote Originally Posted by motorrad View Post
    Hey Dan, what type hitch carrier did you get? I'm still shopping for one, narrowing it down. Just curious, are you the YamaLink as in producing the cool suspension lowering kit? Had to ask.

  5. #25
    Diggin'dirt motorrad's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Name
    Tom
    Location
    Carmel Valley
    Bike(s)
    WR250R
    Posts
    1,746

    Re: Bought a Yamaha WR250R

    Quote Originally Posted by YamaLink View Post
    Hi,
    Yes sir, I'm the lowering link guy.
    Thank you Dan for the tips on carry hitches. And I'm really interested in your product for my vertically challenged 29" inseam on the WRR. I'm finding it great training to be perched up high for balance, but a few times only being able to plant one foot has been a challenge. So going for the natural seat lowering first.

    Here is a great link on Thumpertalk for lowering a WR250R stock. Join TT so you can see pics for step by step.

    I read about YamaLink, a really cool product, lowers center gravity for turning in the dirt, may mean lowering (raising) front forks a bit in triple clamp to compensate. Seems fairly minor, but geometry and suspension settings seem key to dial this bike in. Thoughts?
    Last edited by motorrad; 10-17-2008 at 08:38 PM.
    You can't always get what you want, but if you try sometimes, you get what you need - The Rolling Stones

  6. #26
    Go'n some place new...... 2on2off's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Name
    Jim
    Location
    Reedley, California
    Bike(s)
    KTM 500EXC, Goldwing
    Posts
    1,777

    Re: Bought a Yamaha WR250R

    Quote Originally Posted by motorrad View Post
    Thank you Dan for the tips on carry hitches. And I'm really interested in your product for my vertically challenged 29" inseam on the WRR. I'm finding it great training to be perched up high for balance, but a few times only being able to plant one foot has been a challenge. So going for the natural seat lowering first.

    Here is a great link on Thumpertalk for lowering a WR250R naturally. Join TT so you can see pics for step by step.

    I read about YamaLink, a really cool product, lowers center gravity for turning in the dirt, may mean lowering (raising) front forks a bit in triple clamp to compensate. Seems fairly minor, but geometry and suspension settings seem key to dial this bike in. Thoughts?
    Hi Tom: Sounds like you are having fun dialing in the WR.

    I'm not familiar with the yamalink lowering product but I have had friends who have used lowering links to lower off road bikes in past years.

    In their case, there was always a trade off. When my friends lowered their dirt bikes, it did change the geometry of the suspension and caused early bottoming when riding through whoops and tended to make the front end want to wash out and not bite in sandy turns. But, it was much easier to touch the ground when stopped.

    My friends all returned their bikes to stock suspension settings and reverted to cutting foam from the seat to lower the bike and set the sag on the rear shock spring to also lower the bike's seat height. The suspension trade offs when they used lowering links were not worth it but that was at least five years ago so products may have changed for the better since then.

    Just my 2 cents.
    I came to ride and ride and ride and ride............

  7. #27
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Name
    Dan
    Location
    Boise
    Bike(s)
    Honda Cub Hillclimb Missile
    Posts
    18

    Re: Bought a Yamaha WR250R

    Good input, and it's what many think of aftermarket links or rockers.

    Aftermarket links or rockers are not for everyone: heavy riders who insist on using the stock spring that is too light for them to begin with, big jumpers, riders who do NOT want to reset sag or take the time to dial in the clickers. For many it's a great alternative to not touching the ground and crashing.

    Bottoming is caused by a link/rocker with an increased leverage ratio which makes the bike more plush, the rear wheel move through the travel arc easier, and ultimately, the bike bottom easier. You actually GAIN more travel with an increased leverage link, not lose travel like many think.

    If you needed a stiffer spring to begin with then you definitely need one with an aftermarket link. But more than likely you were bottoming severely with a stock setup and didn't know it because the progression of the shock and that rubber bumper is SO stiff that you don't see the rubber black marks. Manufacturers put that rubber bumper there as a way for customers not to report back, "hey, your bike's rear suspension doesn't work because my rear wheel hits the back fender." Unfortunately, when you hit that rubber bumper, all compression and rebound adjustments are moot. You are DONE.

    If a spring rate is correct, going in clockwise on a shock's high speed compression a little bit helps offset a too-plush/easier-bottoming shock.

    Front ends washing out is understeering or oversteering, obviously. That means someone's forks are too high or too low (wow, I'm Captain Obvious). Remember: there is no 1:1 ratio of fork and rear lowering because changes to rake/trail affect geometry at a different speed than changes to the rear. Many non-short racers use 1 inch lowering links now for lowering purposes but to get their bike's center of gravity lower which helps in turning while making it turn better due to increased wheel bike; the rider also gets less fatigued because the braking and acceleration bumps are soaked up better. Usually one inch in rear gets .25 inches of front lowering, give or take based on personal preference and terrain. Go too much and the front wheel shakes like a wet dog. Go not enough and it turns like an NHRA dragster.

    So you take the above scenarios (spring too light, forks at wrong height, sag not set, etc.) and it's easy to see why one would think a lowering link is baaaad news, especially when you have one rider telling ten riders.

    Quote Originally Posted by 2on2off View Post
    Hi Tom: Sounds like you are having fun dialing in the WR.

    I'm not familiar with the yamalink lowering product but I have had friends who have used lowering links to lower off road bikes in past years.

    In their case, there was always a trade off. When my friends lowered their dirt bikes, it did change the geometry of the suspension and caused early bottoming when riding through whoops and tended to make the front end want to wash out and not bite in sandy turns. But, it was much easier to touch the ground when stopped.

    My friends all returned their bikes to stock suspension settings and reverted to cutting foam from the seat to lower the bike and set the sag on the rear shock spring to also lower the bike's seat height. The suspension trade offs when they used lowering links were not worth it but that was at least five years ago so products may have changed for the better since then.

    Just my 2 cents.

  8. #28
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Name
    Dan
    Location
    Boise
    Bike(s)
    Honda Cub Hillclimb Missile
    Posts
    18

    Re: Bought a Yamaha WR250R

    I have that very, very informative thumpertalk tutorial on my site. The originator of the step-by-step gave us permission to use his pictures. You would not believe how many dealers do not know the bike can be lowered about an inch in back. That's why the tutorial is front-and-center on the wr250r/x page.


    Quote Originally Posted by motorrad View Post
    Thank you Dan for the tips on carry hitches. And I'm really interested in your product for my vertically challenged 29" inseam on the WRR. I'm finding it great training to be perched up high for balance, but a few times only being able to plant one foot has been a challenge. So going for the natural seat lowering first.

    Here is a great link on Thumpertalk for lowering a WR250R naturally. Join TT so you can see pics for step by step.

    I read about YamaLink, a really cool product, lowers center gravity for turning in the dirt, may mean lowering (raising) front forks a bit in triple clamp to compensate. Seems fairly minor, but geometry and suspension settings seem key to dial this bike in. Thoughts?

  9. #29
    Diggin'dirt motorrad's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Name
    Tom
    Location
    Carmel Valley
    Bike(s)
    WR250R
    Posts
    1,746

    Re: Bought a Yamaha WR250R

    Thank you Jim, Dan. Very much appreciate both of your experienced insight in helping me set up my bike. The more I read and learn about adjustments one can make to best suit their bike and ride preference, the more I appreciate the time needed to dial things in. One tweak at a time. I'm adding a few items now to harden the bike, and trying out some basic suspension adjustments for sag, preload, and rebound dampening. After some more saddle time on dirt, I plan to adjust the rear suspensions lower jam nut and shock block to lower the seat height by about 3/4" and raise the front forks in triple clamp by 1/4". Then test some more to see how it rides.

    Right now with pretty much stock settings, I can tippy-toe it on a flat surface. Not a problem, just interested to see how it feels when I can touch the balls of my feet. For instance, I can't sit and walk the bike now when stopped on even a mild slope, which kind of bugs me. Easy enough to jump off and walk it I guess, just saying.

    One question, hope this is not to stupid. If I lower the seat height by adjusting the rear shocks jam nut, will I loose ground clearance? Or is the reduced seat height realized through less travel in the shock?
    You can't always get what you want, but if you try sometimes, you get what you need - The Rolling Stones

  10. #30
    Super Member GS-RON's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Name
    Ron
    Location
    Paradise,Ca
    Bike(s)
    '08 ZX-14
    Posts
    1,954

    Re: Bought a Yamaha WR250R

    Quote Originally Posted by motorrad View Post
    One question, hope this is not to stupid. If I lower the seat height by adjusting the rear shocks jam nut, will I loose ground clearance? Or is the reduced seat height realized through less travel in the shock?
    Since the seat is firmly bolted to the frame, yes. Ground clearance will be lost if the seat height is reduced by any means other than shaving the seat...
    I'm not lost, I'm right there at the cursor on my GPS...Where ever that is

    Do a poppa-wheelie

    I cried because I could not wheelie, till I met a man with no motorcycle..

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. I can't believe I'm saying this, Just bought two new Hondas
    By ronrdrcr in forum Motorcycle Photography
    Replies: 18
    Last Post: 04-08-2008, 02:06 PM
  2. Bought a new helmet.
    By NewRiderr in forum General Bike Related Topics
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 04-01-2008, 04:38 PM
  3. First bike bought!
    By gator4798 in forum Becoming a Better Rider - Riding Skills and Safety Techniques
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 03-31-2008, 12:58 AM
  4. I just bought one
    By Steve1962 in forum GPS & Mapping Technology for Travel
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 05-14-2007, 01:20 AM
  5. Bought a M/C!!
    By myhrdly in forum General Bike Related Topics
    Replies: 30
    Last Post: 04-08-2007, 09:47 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •