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Thread: Grade 70 oil

  1. #1
    It's too cold here... montana's Avatar
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    Shrug Grade 70 oil

    It's time again for the "help me" part of our program:

    So I bought all the stuff to change my oil and bring the bike out of winterization. In so doing, I belatedly found that some genius put Grade 70 cycle oil in with the regular multi-grade shelf. So, I'm wondering if this stuff is any good for my Vulcan 1500 twin. Keeping in mind that it stays relatively warm in the garage (above 50) and won't ever get above about 95 during the days here, can I use it? Can I mix it with 'regular' oil? For the record, I tend to run constant rpm's on the freeway for long distances. The oil in question is Castrol 'Grand Prix' 4-stroke motorcycle oil. It does not indicate synthetic.

    The recommended oil in the book is: SE or SF (not SH) 10W-30, 10W-40, 20W-40, or 20W-50.

    I'm sure I didn't do any damage, but the whole reason for my question is that I discovered this as I was pouring it in and it just looked thicker. So, there's only about a cup in the motor right now, and I'm sure it's not going to hurt anything if it turns out I need to put in a lighter oil.

    So, any advice?

  2. #2
    no role model MyLife on TwoWheels's Avatar
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    Re: Grade 70 oil

    If I recall correctly, grade 70 is roughly equivilent to SAE 30, they use it as gearbox oil in dirtbikes.
    I don't anticipate any problem.

  3. #3
    Snow dancing marko's Avatar
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    Re: Grade 70 oil

    Quote Originally Posted by montana
    It's time again for the "help me" part of our program:

    So I bought all the stuff to change my oil and bring the bike out of winterization. In so doing, I belatedly found that some genius put Grade 70 cycle oil in with the regular multi-grade shelf. So, I'm wondering if this stuff is any good for my Vulcan 1500 twin. Keeping in mind that it stays relatively warm in the garage (above 50) and won't ever get above about 95 during the days here, can I use it? Can I mix it with 'regular' oil? For the record, I tend to run constant rpm's on the freeway for long distances. The oil in question is Castrol 'Grand Prix' 4-stroke motorcycle oil. It does not indicate synthetic.

    The recommended oil in the book is: SE or SF (not SH) 10W-30, 10W-40, 20W-40, or 20W-50.

    I'm sure I didn't do any damage, but the whole reason for my question is that I discovered this as I was pouring it in and it just looked thicker. So, there's only about a cup in the motor right now, and I'm sure it's not going to hurt anything if it turns out I need to put in a lighter oil.

    So, any advice?
    Um, two things:

    1. SE and SF oils are pretty much obsolete. Any current moto oil is fine. I think the current standard is SM. "S" indicates that it's for a gas engine, the second letter indicates performance levels and protection. Personally, I don't use car oils in my bikes, athough there are as many debates about this as there about WD40 and o-ring chains.

    2. Check the SAE rating. If it's SAE 70, that's a straight weight oil used in high perf motors and gear boxes. You COULD use it in your bike, but you run the risk of the oil not getting to where it needs to be because of it being so thick. Once it warms up and on hot days you'd be fine, but on cooler days, that oil is going to be pretty thick and your engine may not have any oil in certain places. Personally, I'd change it. A lot of damage can happen to your valve train and various bearings in the time it takes a 70 weight to warm up.

    Personally, I like a 5w30 in the winter and a 10w50 in the summer.
    Marko

    "Don't sweat the petty stuff and don't pet the sweaty stuff."

  4. #4
    no role model MyLife on TwoWheels's Avatar
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    Re: Grade 70 oil

    Quote Originally Posted by marko
    Um, two things:

    1. SE and SF oils are pretty much obsolete. Any current moto oil is fine. I think the current standard is SM. "S" indicates that it's for a gas engine, the second letter indicates performance levels and protection. Personally, I don't use car oils in my bikes, athough there are as many debates about this as there about WD40 and o-ring chains.

    2. Check the SAE rating. If it's SAE 70, that's a straight weight oil used in high perf motors and gear boxes. You COULD use it in your bike, but you run the risk of the oil not getting to where it needs to be because of it being so thick. Once it warms up and on hot days you'd be fine, but on cooler days, that oil is going to be pretty thick and your engine may not have any oil in certain places. Personally, I'd change it. A lot of damage can happen to your valve train and various bearings in the time it takes a 70 weight to warm up.

    Personally, I like a 5w30 in the winter and a 10w50 in the summer.
    Castrol Grand Prix 4-Stroke Motorcycle Oil

  5. #5
    Senior Member planeoldguy's Avatar
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    Re: Grade 70 oil

    I use Castrol syntec in all of my vehicles, I just wish the FJ would give off that beautiful Castrol R smell, uh, wait, maybe not..............

  6. #6
    no role model MyLife on TwoWheels's Avatar
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    Re: Grade 70 oil

    Ahhh!!! Nothing like the smell of bean oil in the morning!!
    Brings back memories of me 'ol racin' days!

  7. #7
    It's too cold here... montana's Avatar
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    Re: Grade 70 oil

    So, basically, from that spec sheet, it's virtually identical in every property but the important ones: overall viscosity (nearly twice that of the multi-grades) and cold-cranking viscosity (off the chart?).

    In any event, I'm convinced. The thick stuff is outta here. I'll keep the one I opened and dribble it in with the lighter oil, but the others go back in favor of more bike-friendly viscosities.

    Thanks, all for the help.

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    Snow dancing marko's Avatar
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    Re: Grade 70 oil

    I'm no oil expert by any stretch. I had to check on Grade 70, this was what I got.... of course, it's all up to you.

    From a Automotive Oil Marketer, found by Google search.
    "For technoids, weights are defined thusly (stokes and centistrokes are measurements of viscosity):

    "SAE 30 is SAE 30 no matter what the "W" prefix number is: 0W, 5W or 10W. This viscosity in centistokes (cSt) @ 100 degrees C is with the minimum of 9.3 cSt and a maximum of 12.5 cSt.

    "SAE 40 is SAE 40 no matter what the "W" prefix number is: 5W, 10W, 15W or 20W. The viscosity @ 100 degrees C is within the minim of 12.5 cSt and a maximum of 16.3 cSt.

    "SAE 50 is SAE 50 no matter what the "W" prefix number is: 5W, 10W, 15W or 25W. The viscosity @ 100 degrees C is within the minimum of 16.3 cSt and a maximum of 21.9 cSt.

    "SAE 60 is SAE 60 no matter what the "W" prefix number is: 10W, 15W or 25W. The viscosity @ 100 degrees C is within the minimum of 21.9 cSt and a maximum of 26.1 cSt.

    "There is no SAE 70 and no one is likely to make one with a "W" prefix number although it is possible using a synthetic base oil. This viscosity is identified as Grade 70. The viscosity @ 100 degrees C has a minimum of 26.1 cSt and no maximum."

    The difference between a multigrade and a singlegrade oil: The singlegrade can't pass the low temperature viscosity test. If it did meet one of the following "W" viscosities, it would be a multigrade.

    Singlegrade oils will become obsolete for performance engines in the future. We dropped SAE 30 and SAE 40 because SAE 10W40 does everything 30 or 40 can doŚand some things the straight grades can't doŚlike increasing horsepower. If an off-roader doesn't like 10W40, then use 20W50. It can do everything a 10W40 can do except pass the sub-zero viscosity test at -20 degrees C.

    Multigrade viscosities are run at six different sub-zero temperatures. When a racing-oil designer puts a formula together, he has to know the viscosity at 100 degrees C of every component in the additive composition. He has to have a target viscosity objective for the finished oil in each SAE grade. Once a formula is established, the technician who supervises the blending has to duplicate this formula in the correct proportions every time the product is blended. The viscosity at 100 degrees C has a plus or minus written into the oil's quality-control specification."

    Clearly SAE 30 and Grade 70 aren't the same thing.

    If it was noticably thicker than the other stuff and you only have a cup of it in there... then ya just gotta ask, "hmmmmm, wonder what that's doing to the viscosity?"
    Marko

    "Don't sweat the petty stuff and don't pet the sweaty stuff."

  9. #9
    no role model MyLife on TwoWheels's Avatar
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    Re: Grade 70 oil

    Gee...guess ya showed me!!
    Congratulations!

  10. #10
    Snow dancing marko's Avatar
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    Re: Grade 70 oil

    Geez.

    Sorry if you got the wrong vibe... wasn't trying you "show you" anything.
    Marko

    "Don't sweat the petty stuff and don't pet the sweaty stuff."

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